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Imagine you were offered this job.  Would you apply?  How long would you stay?

Company is seeking focused, organized, hard working individuals to work for our company.  Hours are full time 9 am – 4 pm and an additional 1-3 hours of work will be required to complete at home daily and on the weekends.  Failure to complete any of the assigned work is not tolerated and will result in a permanent mark on your employment record.

Work completed at the office or at home must be completed on time and turned in by deadlines.  Any failure to turn in work by the deadline will result in a negative report in your permanent record.

New skills and information will be added to the job continuously and employees will be tested daily to ensure that they are mastering skills and meeting expectations.  Failure to meet expectations on any of the new skills will result in a negative report in your permanent employment record.

Paid holidays are provided but must be taken on days predetermined by the company.  Those dates are not flexible and no other time off is permitted.  5 sick days per year are allowed but employees are required to complete all work for the days they missed within 3 days.

Interested applicants for must meet the following criteria:

– Be able to work quietly and stay focused in a crowed, busy environment
-Maintain positive attitude
– Ability to be highly organized to complete and turn in work for 8 different clients daily
– Punctual – employees must arrive on time to work daily and turn in all work on time throughout the day

Pay: Nothing but future job training provided.
Hours: 9:00 am – 4:00 pm Mon – Fri. with additional 1-3 hours of work to do at home daily and on the weekends.

Would you apply for this position?  Does it sound stressful?  Does this sound like a good fit for your 6 year old?  What about your 13 year old?

If public education was a job, would you apply Does it sound like a good fit for your 6 year old

This is what our kids are expected to do every day in school.  They learn new often very challenging skills every day and then they take high stakes tests on those skills.  They take their job home with them every night and on the weekends.

Our kids go to school all day, then come home and do homework for at least an hour (let’s be honest, it’s never just an hour) and are expected to be in bed at a regular time and do extra curricular activities.  When do they have time to be kids?  When do they have time to just play?

I am concerned about the loss of our children’s childhood.  I am frustrated that my kids are at school all day and then have to do more work when they get home.  I would like to see homework assigned only when the children didn’t complete work in class – not as additional work.  I hate high stakes tests especially in elementary and middle schools when children mature developmentally at very different rates.  I do not believe the current public school system does a good job preparing our kids for careers as adults.

Before anyone thinks I am bashing teachers, I am not.  My mother, father and sister-in-law have all been wonderful teachers and my children have had amazing teachers and administration.  But teachers are working under the same high stakes environment as their students.

Instead of increasing the stakes and starting kids on this journey at a younger age, I would like to see us go back to schooling that is more about learning.  I am amazed  the things my kids aren’t being taught in the scramble to prepare them for the high stakes testing.

What are your thoughts?  Are your kids stressed at school?  Am I wrong?  I would love to hear from you.

 

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Posted by Frugal Mommy

Hi I’m Heather, a busy, happy and very frugal mom of 8 amazing kids! My journey to become a mom of 8 has been a bumpy one that has included infertility, being a foster parent, adoption, and special needs parenting. I share the things I've learned raising my big unique family.

15 Comments

  1. I say we look at what Finland is doing. It’s working, since they produce the highest level of students (based on several factors including including international test scores, graduation rates) and have basically no unemployment rate. They have lots of breaks. A 4 day work week. Plenty of outdoor time. A nap each day, and 2-3 teachers/classroom. At 15 years old they start an internship in a field they may or may not like and can switch it before they graduate, giving them the experience they need to start working right away. Why is (North) America not adapting to what has already proven to be working? Read more about why Finland schools are successful and what they do here: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/why-are-finlands-schools-successful-49859555/?no-ist

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    1. I love this model!

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  2. Well I don’t have kids and perhaps because at 26 I’m falling to the “lifetime student” category this post seems a little dramatic to me. I went to a school where from 7th-12th grade we had 1-3+ hours a night. In addition, we were require to participate in 2 out of 3 sports seasons during the high school years (so we were at practice til 6pm every night). Yea, it sucked and I would have much rather been mindlessly watching TV, but it prepared me well for college and grad school. At times. I do feel tremendously burnt out and just want to say screw it, quit my job, and blog, BUT I’ve got bills and dreams of becoming a doctor (hello 8 more years of school). I guess my point is that we are now in society were a college degree is basically a high school diploma and a graduate degree is an undergrad degree. In my opinion, the only way to survive that much school is to be adequately prepared, which translates to young children having 1-3 hours of homework each night and mandatory attendance policies.

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    1. The problem with that philosophy is that it is not happening. The number of high school graduates who went on to attend college is dropping. This seems to indicate either that it doesn’t prepare them for college or that they burn out and decide not to go to college. Preparing for college does not need to begin in kindergarten. You seem to be a driven person who enjoys school and that’s great but that isn’t the norm.

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  3. I totally agree. I actually have a teaching certification but the madness of standardized testing is one of the things that caused me to become a librarian instead. I’m also really glad you pointed out that your don’t fault the teachers. They are so overworked and the good ones seem like they are never working because they are always grading, lesson planning, etc. even at home, and now they are being judged on their students’ test scores. Something in this country has got to change when it comes to education.

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  4. My child is only 2, but it does stress me out to think about the amount of homework and the level at which she will have to perform starting at such a young age. Some great things to think about!

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  5. Yes! I totally agree with you and there have been numerous studies conducted (wish I could remember where) that show that homework doesn’t improve learning, retention, or test scores.

    Not only does it use up our kids’ time, but it prevents families from spending time together. The funny thing is that is often the parents that push for more homework. My husband teaches first grade at a public high school and he has parents calling him, asking why their kids don’t have more homework. It’s a crazy world!

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    1. That is just crazy!

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  6. I have always thought homework in elementary school is ridiculous. I am not a parent, yet, but I know I am going to have at least a few arguments with teachers over the subject!

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  7. I was totally thinking, no way I’d never do that!
    Kari
    http://www.sweetteasweetie.com

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    1. I was really thinking about it when my sweet, optimistic daughter started feeling anxious and depressed. Why am I asking my 12 year old to do what I wouldn’t do?

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  8. To be honest as I started reading I thought you were describing being apparent but then realized that wasn’t enough working time.
    Great way to draw your reader in.
    Now about the actual post. I agree the education system is far from perfect. They demand too much and don’t leave room to customize things in a way that fits a larger variety of students…don’t even get me started on standardized testing.
    Each year it gets worse. Whats bad about pre college education is it rarely prepares you for the way college and the real world work and I’m sorry a lot of the things I memorized (see how I saw memorized and not learned) for exams in school haven’t contributed much to my adult life. I also think homework outside or bigger projects is getting out of hand! Don’t they realize parents have jobs and other children they can’t always teach their kids the scholastic lessons that they are sent to school to learn on top of the moral and fundamental life lessons they are already responsible for.
    I don’t have kids but I see it with my nephew and little sisters. Most of my childhood my mom was a single mother, it’s a lot and then throw in helping your kids with 3 hours of homeoworK SMH.
    Great post!

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    1. I so agree. You mom was a super hero. I feel like I already graduated from school so I don’t understand why I as a mom have homework every night.

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  9. My son is only in 1st grade, but it is already stressful the amount of work that is expected of him. This really puts it into perspective.. great post!

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    1. It drives me crazy how young the stress starts.

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