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This secret to calm anxiety attacks in  children is one that I have used often to help my kids when they are experiencing panic or anxiety attacks.  It is simple to do and very comforting and grounding.

Sadly, panic and anxiety attacks are things that several of my children have had to endure.  My daughters had night terrors and panic attacks for the first few years after we adopted them.  My oldest son has seizures and occasional vertigo which lead to anxiety attacks.

I learned this technique by combining things I learned as I tried to help them.  It is so calming to me as their mom to know that I have a way to help them when they need me.

Secret To Calm Anxiety Attacks In Children

Secret To Calm Anxiety Attacks In Children:

  • Have the child sit in a comfortable position next to you.
  • Gently squeeze the outside of their arms starting just below their shoulders and going down to just above their elbows.  When you get to the elbows, go back and start at just below the shoulders again.
  • Talk to them calmly and ask them to name 3 things they can see, hear, and touch.
  • Encourage them to breath slowly in through their nose and out their mouth.
  • Squeezing their arms gently and having them take slow deliberate breaths is physically grounding.  Naming 3 things they can see, hear, and touch, is mentally grounding.

I just used this tonight with my son.  My son was having a seizure but he was conscious and aware of what was happening.   I hate that!  It is so scary for him.  His body is moving and he has no control.  His eyes are rolling as well which makes him feel like the room is spinning.  Just imagine how scary that would be.  This is a perfect recipe for a panic attack.  My son is not able to answer my questions about what he sees, hears, and touches, so I squeeze his arms and sit close enough that he can feel me close to him.  It is amazing and so wonderful how comforting this is for him and how this helps him emotionally and physically.

Tonight, I taught my daughter how to do this.  She sat close to him and squeezed his arms.  Within seconds he had stopped crying and his breathing calmed.  He was able to close his eyes and relax for the rest of the seizure.  It was such a relief to see him calm.

Being able to help a child who is experiencing panic or anxiety is so important for me as a mom.  I am grateful that I know this secret to calm anxiety attacks in children.

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Posted by Frugal Mommy

Hi I’m Heather, a busy, happy and very frugal mom of 8 amazing kids! My journey to become a mom of 8 has been a bumpy one that has included infertility, being a foster parent, adoption, and special needs parenting. I share the things I've learned raising my big unique family.

32 Comments

  1. Other symptoms include refusing to go to school, camp, or a sleepover, and demanding that someone stay with them at bedtime. Children with separation anxiety commonly worry about bad things happening to their parents or caregivers or may have a vague sense of something terrible occurring while they are apart.

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  2. These are really great tips. My son had a seizure once. Scariest thing I ever went through. If he ever has one again, I’ll be sure to employ these tactics.

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    1. I’m so sorry your son had to go through a seizure. I hope you don’t have to go through another one.

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  3. Thanks so much for linking up at the Bloggers Spotlight party! I pinned this to our group board. Don’t forget to come link up again on Thursday and see the featured posts!

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  4. These are really helpful and actionable tips. I will definitely keep them in mind if my son ever suffers from an anxiety attack. Thank you for posting this.

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  5. That’s so sweet that you taught your daughter how to do this. http://popshopamerica.com/

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  6. Great tips shared to control anxiety and I’m happy that it works for your kids!

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    1. Thank you!

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  7. Great tips shared to control anxiety of child. I don’t have kids and was not aware about this behavior.

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    1. Yes kids can have anxiety and panic attacks just like adults. It is hard to watch as a mom and good to have a way to help them feel better.

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  8. That sounds like a good plan. I may have to try that out during our next meltdown. I feel like it might help.

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    1. I hope it helps you.

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  9. That’s amazing! I have anxiety attacks as well. I just try to breath in and out and when I can I try to meditate to calm myself down. Sometimes, it can get bad. So glad you found something that works for you and your family. I’m sure this’ll be helpfully for a lot of parents.

    Alexis | http://www.everythingandlex.wordpress.com

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    1. I do the breathing too but it is nice to know the other techniques in case it gets really bad. Sometimes I squeeze my own arms and that helps.

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  10. I love this post. I just found out over the summer that my teenage daughter had been having panic attacks while at play rehearsal but never told me about them. 🙁 This is all very new to me, so I love having this as a resource. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. I hope this helps your daughter.

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  11. These are all great tips! My husband suffers from severe panic attacks and I’ve heard that it can be genetically passed down (his father and sister both suffer as well) with 2 young boys so far we haven’t had anything too extreme but that’s not to say that it won’t happen.

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    1. I hope your sons don’t have to worry about that.

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  12. This is great advice. I get anxiety attacks now and again. The naming things you can see/hear/smell/ect definitely helps. Coloring also seems to help mellow me out after too.

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    1. Yes! Coloring is great!

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  13. I’m so sorry your precious children have to deal with that! 🙁 I came out of a household of abuse so my sister and I both suffer from panic and anxiety attacks frequently. I don’t like to be touched (I hate it, actually) but I think these other grounding techniques might even work for me as an adult. I’m so glad I clicked on your link, and I’m so happy that this works for your kids!

    Thanks for writing this, thank you SO much! 🙂

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    1. I’m so sorry you had to deal with abuse as a child. I hope these help you.

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  14. I have an almost 11 year old son that struggles with anxiety. These are wonderful tips for handling the worst of attacks.. we have found a few essential oils that help him as well. Best wishes for your family going forward !

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  15. These are great! I’m sorry your babies have to go through that 🙁 These tips might be good for me when I’m having my own anxiety attacks. They hit me so rarely I never really know what to do to help ease them.

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  16. That’s a really excellent tip and I’m sure it works really well. It can be hard sometimes to know what to do when our children are scared or anxious!

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  17. This sounds like a great way to help kids calm down and get grounded again. Thanks for sharing!

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  18. This is great advice. I had be first panic attack at 13 and have suffered anxiety attacks ever since then. I am assuming my daughter will suffer them too so I will try out these tips when the time comes. For now when she gets upset (usually a terrible two tantrum) we work on breathing, go outside where we can concentrate on plants (which was my coping mechanism) and sometimes do some yoga.

    You should come link up at our Bloggers Spotlight party, we pin everything to our group board and have two separate link-ups, one for posts and one devoted to pins so you get even more exposure!
    http://www.raisingfairiesandknights.com/category/bloggers-spotlight/

    Reply

    1. I’m so sorry you have to deal with that but I’m glad you have a good coping mechanism. I will link up!

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  19. I wish I would have had these tips when I was teaching!

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  20. I’ve never heard of this before, but I’m open to anything that works!
    Kari
    http://www.sweetteasweetie.com

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  21. This was the sort of tips that comforted me when I had them during my younger years lovely post friend

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  22. These are great tips. My son is highly sensitive and I think using these techniques will help calm him when it is overwhelmed and unable to control his emotions.

    Reply

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